Insubordination @ Work

Many of us lead initiatives, verticals and organizations where we deliver products or services as a team with inputs from a team comprising multiple skill sets. At times, some of us would have faced a situation where a person gets into the act of wilfully disobeying. This is what is technically called Insubordination.

Having defined Insubordination let us be clear that refusing to perform an action that is unethical or illegal is not insubordination; neither is refusing to perform an action that is not within the scope of authority of the person issuing the order or within the scope of work of the person asked to do the job. Continue reading “Insubordination @ Work”

Three Steps to Optimism

I like to participate regularly in few online forums and break-time discussions. In almost all of these forums and discussions I have noticed a common pattern – The best ideas are from people who are optimist. By optimist I mean people who have a good feeling about everything and start on a note of cheer and belief.  Such people embrace optimism — inside themselves without any pretence. It is their deep-seated behaviour. It is a gift to understand how to project, share, and inspire with optimism. It is an even greater act of generosity to be inspired by optimism from others and to be willing to receive it.


The capacity to be a natural recipient of ideas and other peoples' optimism is what makes for the ultimate optimist. You may be open to experimenting with new things, but do you truly see the good in something before the bad? The order of this thought process is critical: to try and see everything good in an idea before seeing anything bad. I request that you read the previous line once again…


While most of us like to think we do, and would therefore self-describe ourselves as optimistic, more often (if we are truly honest with ourselves) we are natural critics (even cynics). Continue reading “Three Steps to Optimism”

Ways to convince a Skeptic…

 

Part of my job is to experiment with new ideas and to structure it into a process so that the idea ensures better efficiency at work. En-route this process I deal with people, end users and decision makers, who evaluate the proposal and critique it.


More often than not, most proposals are turned down on grounds that are not technical. No matter how convinced and clear cut the proposal is, I have realized that few people inadvertently are sceptical because of limitations, either of knowledge or finance or anything in-between, on their end.

 

Bottom line is that swaying a person to accept an idea is tough, especially if he or she is a skeptic. To overcome their cynicism, I have learned that I need to adjust my style.


Here are four ways to influence a non-believer:  Continue reading “Ways to convince a Skeptic…”

Games Bosses Play!


Most of us have been in jobs long enough to know games played at work and have insights into key strategies doled out to keep the Boss-Employee equation well balanced. Though most of us may believe that these games are fair-play, few of us have greyed with experience of boss's dirty-tricks and suitable remedial action by employee subject to varying magnitude of skills, strategies and strength that each may have. After all the equation between Boss and Employee is balanced only when the fouls anticipated are counteracted by the right rules. Here is a compilation inspired through grapevine discussions near the water-cooler, the usual hullabaloo at lunch-time and interesting articles floating on the net. Continue reading “Games Bosses Play!”

Why Managers don’t say “ I do not know… please help me!”?

 

Ok… now I am confident I qualify to write this post given my experiences as Manager!

 

 

 

While at work as Manager, I have been fortunate to head a department (at some point), work with responsible colleagues and report to senior-management and mix-match of all of these. Through the years, I have – time and again – come across situations where many managers are afraid to utter sentences like "I don't know," "Would you help me?" or "I'm not sure I get it." Somehow, the central believe in failing to admit when one makes a mistake or lacks knowledge is that acceptance will make one less effective. Continue reading “Why Managers don’t say “ I do not know… please help me!”?”

The Value of Experience over Skill

(This however does not imply that Skill is not required. It has its own indispensable benefits which I shall cover some other day.) I work in a very interesting environment where I meet people – young and old, and we share ideas – skilled and staled! Business cultures are prone to value people in the context of their age. If you're a low number, you have a lot of potential. If you're a high number, not so much. Continue reading “The Value of Experience over Skill”